Our Dairy Cows, Dairy Cow Breeds, Dairy Cow Facts, California Dairy, small cow breeds.#Small #cow #breeds

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A walk on the farm with our Small cow breeds Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds Small cow breeds

These are the cows

that graze and feed, that moo and chew and lay and play and make the milk your body needs.

Small cow breeds

Daily

The foods that make our cows go, “Mmm-oo!”

Small cow breeds

Daily

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

A lesson in Cowology

The ins & outs of California dairy cows.

A lesson in Cowology

The ins & outs of California dairy cows.

Cows belong to a group of animals called ruminants. This means they have four stomach compartments (not four stomachs) that each play a different role in the digestion of food. The four parts of the stomach are called, in order, rumen, reticulum, omasum and the abomasum.

When cows “chew their cud” they’re chewing small wads of feed that have been returned to the mouth to continue the digestion process. Each cud is chewed somewhere between 40 and 60 times (for about one minute).

It takes 50 to 70 hours for a cow to turn grass into feed and most cows give 9 gallons of milk a day!

The nutrients from the feed are turned into milk by four mammary glands found in the udder. The droplets of milk are drained through an opening called a duct into the udder.

Small cow breeds

We care about Animal Care

Small cow breeds

Small cow breeds

Satisfy your cow curiosity with some of the fun facts of dairy.

Small cow breeds

The Holstein Cow

Roughly 2,000 years ago, migrant tribes settling in the Netherlands crossbred black cattle from the Batavians with white cattle from the Friesians, producing what we know today as the Holstein-Friesian. These cows began their journey in America after Winthrop Chenery purchased a Holstein cow from a Dutch sailing master who arrived in Boston in 1852. The cow had provided the ship with fresh milk during the voyage. Chenery soon began importing more Holsteins with other American breeders, helping to establish their presence in America.

  • Excellent milk producers
  • Adaptable to many environments
  • Largest of the U.S. dairy breeds
  • Avg. Weight: 1,500 lbs.
  • Avg. Height: 58 in.
  • Avg. Milk Production: 9 gallons per cow per day
  • Color: Black and white, red and white

Small cow breeds

The Jersey Cow

The origins of the Jersey cow are something of a mystery. However, they were originally bred on the British Channel Island of Jersey as their name implies.

  • 2nd largest breed of dairy cattle in the world
  • Jersey milk is well-known for being particularly rich in protein and minerals
  • It contains 18% more protein, 20% more calcium and 25% more butterfat compared to milk from other breeds
  • Avg. Weight: 880 – 1,100 lbs.
  • Avg. Height: 48 in.
  • Color: Tan with a black nose bordered by a white muzzle

Small cow breeds

Brown Swiss

Quite possibly the oldest breed of dairy cattle in the world, the Brown Swiss originated in Switzerland around 4000 B.C. The Brown Swiss first appeared in the US in 1869 courtesy of Henry M. Clark from Belmont, Massachusetts, who purchased a bull and seven heifers from Col. G. Burgi of Arth, Switzerland.

  • Brown Swiss cattle are very adaptable to different living conditions and are able to produce milk until they are 15 years of age.
  • On average, Swiss cows produce more than 25,581 gallons of milk in a lifetime.

Small cow breeds

The Guernsey Cow

In 960 AD, Robert Duke of Normandy sent a group of monks to the Isle of Guernsey to educate the native people. The monks brought along their best cattle – the Norman Brindle and Froment du Leon – to create a new breed, the Guernsey. Their arrival in the US occurred via Captain Belair of the schooner Pilot in September 1840. His three Norman Brindles, along with the two heifers and bull from the Isle of Guernsey belonging to Captain Prince, were the original stock of the Guernsey herd that continues today.

  • Bred for their high-butterfat, high-protein milk, which contains a high concentration of betacarotene
  • Ideal grazing cows with a gentle disposition and ability to efficiently produce milk with less feed than other breeds

Small cow breeds





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